Coping with Grief – Be Prepared

By definition, grief is the intense emotional suffering caused by loss. When we grieve we often experience a broad range of emotions. These intense emotions interfere with our appetite, sleep, and thinking processes. Grief takes a toll on every aspect of our life.

By Marsha Johnson

By definition, grief is the intense emotional suffering caused by loss. When we grieve we often experience a broad range of emotions. These intense emotions interfere with our appetite, sleep, and thinking processes. Grief takes a toll on every aspect of our life. It touches our lives physically, financially, spiritually, emotionally, and mentally.

Understanding that grief influences all areas of our life it only makes sense to be prepared with a balanced life before tragedy. One way to gauge the balance in your life is to take an inventory of the different areas. Write down the following five areas: Physical, financial, spiritual, emotional, and mental.

With one being weak and five being strong rate each area of your life as it is today. Look at your list and determine where you need to improve. For instance, loss can affect the family finances. Funeral arrangements and hospitals bills can be overwhelming. If you are weak in the financial area you might want to consider talking to a financial advisor. If you see that you need to improve physically then now is the time to get your body in shape before tragedy. Grieving is every bit physical as it is emotional.

When tragedy comes, it is very important to be as sound, settled, and grounded in all areas of your life. Being prepared will not make the grief less intense but it will make a difference in your ability to cope with loss. And your ability to cope with loss determines your recovery.

It takes one second, one split second, to have a life changing event. One crisis and a life is changed forever.

Imagine, for one moment, being a Policeman. He gets up in the morning puts on his nice crisp uniform, shiny badge, and then attaches a gun to his hip. A policeman does not use his gun each and every day of his career. As a matter of fact, he walks out the door with the hopes that he does not have to pull his gun from its holster that day. However, an officer is prepared at all times. He carries his weapon for that one moment, that one split second in life when he will need it. Although he hopes for the best he prepares for the worst.

And such is life. Although we should hope for the best we too should prepare for the worst. We hope for the best when we plan marriages, children, birthday parties, vacations, and graduations. That's life. That's what we do. And those are the wonderful things that give our lives meaning and purpose. It's what we look forward to. But while we are in the midst of hoping, planning, and anticipating such wonderful moments we should also consider planning and preparing, unfortunately, for that one moment, for that one phone call, that one knock on the door.

When you are prepared you have the edge. Hope for the best while preparing for the worst.


Marsha is a writer,author,speaker and graduate of Tulsa Community College. She is founder of the Center for Grief Recovery and gives speeches, workshops and seminars. Sign up for your free Grief|Recovery Newsletter at
http://www.mygriefrecovery.com

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